Tuesday, February 19, 2013

The West's Death Wish: Wiccan, Pagan holidays at University of Missouri


The first holiday on the list is the Hindu two-day festival celebrating the birth of Krishna, a god considered to be a “warrior, hero, teacher and philosopher.” During the observance, which occurs on Aug. 28 this year, Hindus are likely to forgo sleep in order to, among other things, sing traditional songs.
“Avoid scheduling major academic deadlines on this day, since it is likely that students will be operating on very little sleep,” the guide continues.
Other holidays like Ramadan, Rosh Hashanah and Easter are included in the guide of 43 holidays with varying degrees of suggested accommodations to be granted to students at the 34,000-student public university in Columbia
To downgrade Easter to the status of a Wiccan or Hindu holiday is to deny 2,000 years of Western history. Here's the question: by the time the West finishes clear-cutting its culture in the name of relativism, appeasement and guilt, will there be anything left worth saving?

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9 comments:

Anonymous said...

You're seriously equating this with the death-knell of Western Civilization? I'm pretty certain that our ability to survive will not be determined by a university's administrative observance of Christian holiday's.

You need to relax, man.

RkBall said...

Did I say death knell?

Death by a thousand cuts, my friend. Over at the USDA, diversity experts have the staff pounding their desks shouting the founding fathers were illegal immigrants.

Anon1152 said...

"To downgrade Easter to the status of a Wiccan or Hindu holiday is to deny 2,000 years of Western history"

No. It doesn't. People have different religious beliefs. If a school is going to take one group's beliefs into account when it comes to assignments/tests, they should take all groups into account.

By the way, to "downgrade" a Hindu holiday is to "deny" many thousands of years of (eastern) history.

But surely you aren't saying we should judge a religion by it's age.

RkBall said...

"one group's beliefs into account when it comes to assignments/tests, they should take all groups into account."

Easter and Christmas are cultural as well as religious holidays; they are part of the warp and weave of Western culture; to deny this is to disassociate oneself from 2,000 years of Western history. That's the point I'm making.

"many thousands of years of (eastern) history."

You just made my point, dude.

Anonymous said...

No, Richard, YOU'RE the one missing the point here; if we're going to treat one superstition as "special", then you have to treat ALL superstitions as "special".
SDC

RkBall said...

Only one "superstition" in the West has driven the establishment of hospitals, schools, free education for every child, welfare, not to mention of science and its innumerable life-saving, extending and enjoyment-enhancing inventions.

Glad to see you are still around.

Anonymous said...

What "history" books are you reading? Your cult has resisted every advancement of science, and the only reason it has had a hand in anything else in western civilization is because Constantine happened to choose it as a way of trying to hold his failing empire together; he stole from the other cults of the time, and gave yours a favoured position. And all of that was only because he managed to win a battle in 312, because the other guy was on a pontoon bridge that fell apart; that accident of history is the only reason your superstition is any more popular today than Zoroastrianism.
SDC

RkBall said...

Great, now you're going to have all the Zoroastrianists on my back.

harebell said...

These holidays should only be recognised by non-secular schools. All secular establishments should ignore any religious grounds for missing any exam or even classes.
Easter should have no more priority than any other fate mentioned in a faerie tale and neither should xmas. Both were lifted wholesale from previous faiths anyway.
The only holidays that should be respected are secular ones, because they usually celebrate something real for rational reasons.
Remembrance day, Canada day, New Year's day etc.

"... nothing intellectually compelling or challenging.. bald assertions coupled to superstition... woefully pathetic"