Monday, May 16, 2011

104 And Counting: Thank You, Liberal Party of Canada!

Leader of the Official Opposition (Canada)                                   Image via Wikipedia
Source: National Post:
A 16-year-old male faces 104 charges after being arrested in connection with a break-and-enter on Wednesday afternoon.
The teen, whose identity cannot be revealed under the Youth Criminal Justice Act, is alleged to have acted with a companion...
The accused faces 47 counts of mischief, 46 counts of theft under $5,000 and eight counts of possession of property obtained by crime, among other charges.
Canada's criminal youth laws are tilted towards offenders getting off with a light sentence and no criminal record. This is why older criminals solicit youths for their criminal enterprises -- the law of unintended consequences is alive and well in Canada. Thank you, Liberal Party of Canada for Aiding and Abetting! (No wonder immigrants, coming from tough-on-crime cultures, are voting Conservative. Liberals have the criminal vote locked up, but that's about it.)

Contrast Canada with Singapore.

The crime rate in Singapore is one of the lowest in the world. In Singapore, a person who steals is not considered a victim or a troubled person; he is considered, what's the word, a thief. In Singapore, this guy would face a caning. Caning, or lashing, acts as both a strong deterrent and an unforgettable brush with the law that makes a person think twice about reoffending. It is also a way of indelibly impressing upon the offender  society's stern disapproval of criminal behaviour. "Spare the rod, spoil the child."

We need to be both tough and compassionate -- it's not either/or.

And that's the way the Ball bounces.

So, what kind of sentence should a guy convicted of 104 charges get?

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

I totally agree. Also, it's interesting that you bring up Singapore's caning method. Personally, I think corporal punishment for criminals may be a good thing. It's cost effective and sends a strong message to criminals. Of course, critics would slam the idea for being inhumane -- but these are criminals we're talking about; those who have hurt others or have damaged property.

RkBall said...

When you damage someone's property, you damage them. As Rex Murphy said recently, when you steal someone's wood, you are stealing their labour. You also rob a person of their sense of security -- you violate them.

maryT said...

I think a person up on a first offense should be punished as it is probably the first time he/she was caught. 6 months in jail should do the trick. We also have to remove the part of the yoa that disallows a name to be published.
In fact get rid of the young offender act. Most young offenders who get off turn out to be old offenders. Basketball courts will not do the job.

RkBall said...

What about restitution?

Cory said...

I think that it's very dangerous to punish youth criminals to the point that they have permanent records. Where do you think many of these will end up if they can't find work? On the public dole, which means you and I will have to pay for these miscreants.

A three-strike law should be in force so that once-only offenders can have that 2nd and 3rd chance to get going.

I'm speaking from experience, I should add. I can't imagine where I'd be today if I had a permanent record for one stupid mistake I made so long ago.

Anonymous said...

I work in a young offender's facility in Ontario. Trust me when I say when young offenders get a secure custody diposition, other than severity of the crime for first time offenders (e.g. murder), it takes a lot before they finally see the inside of a facility. And I'm telling you, if the public, other than what they've already read in the papers, only knew the true extent of the coddling that goes on in here, you would guys would be screaming in outrage.

Anonymous said...

caning for a DUI, love it

Anonymous said...

That's our liberal Young Offenders' Act for you. Remember, these poor little lambies are really the victims here.
I think the old Juvenile Delinquents Act should be re-instated. Yeah, that would mean the names of these poor little victims would be there for all to read, and we would all know what kind of creep little Billy from down the street really is.
NO QUARTER

RkBall said...

maryT - I was thinking six months too.

RkBall said...

Cory, one mistake, OK. But not 104, right?

Sixth Estate said...

You really want to take lessons in criminal justice from an authoritarian state?

Jeez... Maybe we should also eliminate freedom of speech and bring back hangings! That would be just like Singapore, too.

RkBall said...

Restricting freedom of speech has already happened. It's happening now.

Maybe we should bring back the noose. We can talk about it.

RkBall said...

And restrictions on freedom of speech have been brought to you by the Liberal Party of Canada, and their political human rights appointees. Quashing politically incorrect speech is a Liberal value.

Rob said...

The fact of the matter is that after 5 years of a clean record one can apply for an absolute pardon,which clears an arrest record to all but a court.
So a criminal conviction isn't that long term blot if you just did something stupid when you were young.

Anonymous said...

old white guy says. you can't rehabilitate someone until you have punished them. the more severe the punishment the easier it will be to get the criminal, young or old to see the error of their ways.

"... nothing intellectually compelling or challenging.. bald assertions coupled to superstition... woefully pathetic"